skenergyshot:

fruit-de-la-mer:

this is literally one of my favorite pieces of art ever

this should be a fucking book

twoblondegirlsaremakingmedothis:

typhoonwizard:

fallen-fighter-:

dicebound:

Don’t be Ashamed!

Never be ashamed

Never be ashamed! 

Have pride! you play the greatest game ever made!

twoblondegirlsaremakingmedothis:

typhoonwizard:

fallen-fighter-:

dicebound:

Don’t be Ashamed!

Never be ashamed

Never be ashamed! 

Have pride! you play the greatest game ever made!

thecomicartblog:

Atmospheric art from The Hound, a re-imagining of the Cu Chulainn myth from Ireland. 

It’s a great tale and is brilliant to read via any medium but looks especially exciting accompanied by art like this. 

Whilst this isn’t the first adaptation of the story into comics and  I also doubt it will be the last, there are plenty of great stories surrounding the Hound of Ulster for many comics yet to come. 

Anyhoo, you can see more of The Hound, written by Barry Devlin and drawn by Paul Bolger, by supporting the Kickstarter. 

fallintosanity:

ceescedasticity:

fallintosanity:

ceescedasticity:

roachpatrol:

So in the middle of the night I had an interesting thought about magical worlds, and the trope where magical worlds gradually lose their magic as they age— for instance, Narnia, and Middle Earth. While I guess the mundane explanation is they’re parables about how Christians think everything sucks…

This is only tangentially related, but it reminded me of the Ile-Rien books by Martha Wells — one 1500s-ish, one 1890s-ish, three 1920s-ish, all in a different world so it’s hard to say for sure. The 1500s-ish one is just crawling with Fae and part Fae, but by the 1890s-ish one hardly any Fae are around to be seen, because of the railroads. Human magic is still going strong, so it’s not that the world is less magical, but it’s different.

(I’m going to take a second to squee that you’ve also read the Ile-Rien books, because it’s so rare to find other people who have, and they’re such good books.)

I do wish Ms. Wells had had the opportunity to write more in that world, especially given the ending of the trilogy. There’s got to be all sorts of interesting implications for magic transfer, not just raw energy like in Roach’s theory but also for knowledge of technique, understanding of the forces involved, and philosophy. She does worldbuilding so well, and I would love to read more stories in Ile-Rien.

Ile-Rien love!

I loved the Raksura books, too, but Wizard Hunters and Death of the Necromancer are probably still my favorites of hers.

Woo! *fistbump*

I haven’t read the Raksura books yet because I’m a lazy slacker because between work and school, I’ve just had no time to read lately. :( I did read her YA book “Emilie and the Hollow World”, though, which was pretty good. My favorites are Death of the Necromancer and City of Bones, with the entirety of the Fall of Ile-Rien trilogy a close runner-up. Tremaine Valiarde is still one of my go-to examples of “this is how you write an awesome character who happens to be female”.

I just… I adore her worldbuilding. One of these days I’m going to work up the nerve to drop an ask in her Tumblr whether she intended for a background connection between her earlier books. If you look carefully, there seems to be a lot of overlap between the ancient civilizations that left behind portals to/from the main worlds in City of Bones, Wheel of the Infinite, and the Fall of Ile-Rien trilogy. It would be incredibly awesome if they really are linked, and if so, if she could someday write another book exploring that link or that civilization.

(Sorry, I have Feelings about Martha Wells’ books and portals to other worlds and how she does magic and Precursers and and and… XD )

thegeek531:

pdxpax:

msfizabe:

tygermama:

The Muppets - “Mahna Mahna”

aka ‘the BEST SONG EVER’

If you don’t reblog Mahna Mahna, we’re not friends.

For Mahna Mahna reasons. And we are so friends.

And for those who dont know, this is from the very first Muppets episode.

"Why would Erythnul herself serve a mortal Empress you ask? Let me tell you. When a storm comes, what follows? A period of calm. A stoic ray of sun. And what proceeds that soothing period? Another storm. The longer the peace, the greater the maelstrom afterward. Empress Carmina is the herald of the greatest, longest, most productive peace this world may ever know. For when she is gone, when the memory of her fades, pandemonium will come. A clamor the likes of which may very well end all peace that could ever come again." —Minister Paulos Gasudairn, his final speech from the floor of the Great House of Merchants before his unlikely suicide, Year 412 of Our Holy Empress Carmina’s Reign
thegmscreen:

https://twitter.com/FateCorps/status/448695277147262976